Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker

Story dissection tools.

r

I hope you’re not squeamish. On this HowSound, I take a scalpel to a profile on papermaker Joanne Rosser. I peel back the surface of the story to reveal its narrative and production innards.

No blood. No stench. Just audio storytelling under the microscope. Listen hard.

And, you have permission to take notes, if you like.

Best, Rob

PS — Registration is open for the Third Coast International Audio Festival in Chicago, October 5-7. Maybe I’ll see you there?

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12 comments to Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker

  • nicole

    one thing that drives me crazy in any reporting are unexplained details. for example, in this story we never find out why she has to iron the paper. why is this important? one more sentence would have explained…

  • rob

    Hey Nicole, Thanks for writing. I have to agree with you. A lack of information like that can be a distraction. A listener, trying to figure out what’s going on, stops listening. Meanwhile, the story continues and they’re still distracted by the unclear information.

    Then again, I suppose, a piece can’t include everything, especially a non-narrated piece where you rely solely the words spoken by the interviewee. So, I think, the question is, if the ironing isn’t fully explained, will it distract the listener or will they be able to put two and two together and figure out that it’s a way to flatten and dry the paper.

    I often have difficulty calculating what I think the audience will understand and what they won’t.

    Thanks for listening!
    r

  • Laurence Stevenson

    These are the things we always see in 20/20 hindsight. You never know what is important..because the subject, not you, is the expert. It may not be possible to leave a distracting phrase out as it may be something staggeringly key. Sometimes you just have to hope that the audience can, given enough context (which you CAN control), join the dots.

  • [...] As some reference, we recommend listening to an episode of Howsound, the radio show that takes you behind the scenes to understand how these shows are produced- Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker. [...]

  • Adi Narayan

    Hey Rob
    This was a great dissection. I was just working through a piece on a kite maker and was struggling with figuring out how to make the narrative work. This gives some good ideas that I can apply right away!
    PS- It’ll be great if you could do a segment looking at how to write good intros.. especially for pieces that aren’t newsy and don’t have a straightforward peg.

    Thanks, Adi

  • [...] thought it was great, just because it kept my interest. I then listened to Howsound’s “Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaking” and figured out what makes me like this story and how it keeps my [...]

  • [...] For a great reference audio reference, you moight want to listen to an episode of Howsound, the radio show that takes you behind the scenes to understand how these shows are produced- Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker. [...]

  • [...] I chose to listen to Radio Lab‘s Ghost Stories.  Before listening, I paid attention to the Dissection of Joanne Rosser-Papermaker, and it was mentioned that I should try to discern paragraphs during an audio story, as well as an [...]

  • […] For a great reference reference, you might listen to an episode of Howsound, the radio show that takes you behind the scenes to understand how these shows are produced- Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker. […]

  • […] the radio show that takes you behind the scenes to understand how these shows are produced- Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker. Note the idea of “paragraphs” in a […]

  • […] was great to see how, as in the Joanne Rosser story, audio layers can effectively pull a story from what could otherwise be construed as a boring […]

  • […] For a great reference, you might listen to an episode of Howsound, the radio show that takes you behind the scenes to understand how these shows are produced- Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker. […]

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